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STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: November 24, 2007Space station commander Peggy Whitson and flight engineer Dan Tani began repressurizing the Quest airlock module at 11:54 a.m. today, officially closing out a "hugely successful" seven-hour four-minute *****ewalk to finish connecting the new Harmony module to the lab's power and cooling systems. The work clears the way for launch of the shuttle Atlantis on Dec. 6 to deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus research module to the outpost.This was the third *****ewalk in 15 days for the Expedition 16 crew, the 22nd EVA so far this year and the 99th devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998.During today's *****ewalk, Whitson and Tani connected a second set of ammonia coolant supply and return lines to the new Harmony module; finished reconnecting the station-to-shuttle power transfer system that lets docked shuttles tap into the lab's solar power grid; and carried out a second inspection of the station's contaminated right-side solar array rotary joint.The astronauts also prepared the Harmony module's right side port for attachment of the Columbus research module next month while flight controllers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston worked through procedures to fully activate Harmony, checking out its electrical and cooling system connections. Activation had been planned for Sunday, but the work was moved up a day.Space station flight director Derek Hassmann described today's excursion as a "hugely successful *****ewalk.""We were able to connect the node 2/Harmony module to the other string of the permanent ammonia cooling system," he said. "And because the crew got out the door early today as they always do, we were able to move early our node 2 final activations. Both node 2 thermal cooling systems are up and running inside the Harmony module, both MDMs, or computers, are powered up and both strings of power systems are up and running. That was an activity that wasn't scheduled until tomorrow. So once again, the crew has enabled us to get ahead."Today's *****ewalk capped one of the busiest three weeks in station assembly.Harmony was launched to the station aboard the shuttle Discovery Oct. 23 and temporarily attached to the central Unity module's left-side port. After the shuttle departed, Whitson and flight engineer Yuri Malenchenko staged a *****ewalk Nov. 9 to prepare the shuttle docking port on the front of the Destiny module for attachment to Harmony.The docking port, known as pressurized mating adapter No. 2, was successfully moved to Harmony, using the station's robot arm, on Nov. 12. Two days later, the Harmony/PMA-2 "stack" was moved to the front of Destiny and robotically bolted in place. During a *****ewalk Tuesday, Whitson and Tani connected one of two ammonia coolant loops and, running ahead of schedule, completed all required electrical connections. They also hooked up part of the station-to-shuttle power transfer system that lets docked shuttles tap into the lab's power grid.During today's *****ewalk, they finished the job and carried out the solar alpha rotary joint inspection to help engineers figure out what might be needed to fix it."When you think about it, with our three *****ewalks, with our two significant robotics activities, what we've accomplished in the last 15 days is equivalent to a very ambitious shuttle assembly mission," Hassmann said. "What makes it special is we've accomplished everything I just described with just the three *****e station crew on board. ... So just an amazing accomplishment, it's a first for the international *****e station program."As for the starboard solar alpha rotary joint, or SARJ, Hassmann said "what they discovered was race ring damage and particulate that was consistent with the damage Dan Tani observed (late last month).""What I gathered from today, and of course the engineers are going to go off and talk about this in great detail, but basically the damage is significant and is widespread," Hassmann said. "I'm not qualified or ready to draw conclusions here today, but we know that the damage is consistent around the race ring. The crew did report the gear teeth themselves looked clean and did not appear to be damaged or rubbed in any off-nominal way, which I took to be good news."With Harmony now wired into the station's main power and cooling systems, NASA is clear to press ahead with launch of the shuttle Atlantis Dec. 6 on mission STS-122. Three *****ewalks are planned for that mission, but it's not yet clear whether any additional SARJ work can be crammed into the already busy mission."What we've done is put the program in a better position on STS-122 to understand what they need to do in terms of either sARJ cleaning or SARJ repairs, etc.," Hassmann said. "So we've gathered additional data, verified the extent of the damage and now the folks have some work to do to quantify and plan exactly what they're going to do to address the SARJ issues on their mission." STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of *****e shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final *****e shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of *****e shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the *****e shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Sweden's first astronaut reflects on shuttle mission EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY NEWS RELEASEPosted: February 2, 2007 Credit: NASA"It was a wonderful flight, extremely exciting. I couldn't have asked for more." ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang recently spoke about his Celsius Mission.On Friday 22 December 2006, Fuglesang, the first Swedish astronaut in *****e, returned to Earth with Space Shuttle Discovery with the rest of the STS-116 crew at the end of the 13-day mission to the International Space Station. During the STS-116 mission Fuglesang parti*****ted in three Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs), or *****ewalks, to continue assembly work on the outside of the Station. "I enjoyed every minute of it. I am very grateful to everyone who helped me to get there. In particular everyone at ESA, there are a lot of people who have supported me for many years." What was it like to be inside the Shuttle for the launch?"The launch was a real highlight! I was never really nervous, which did kind of surprise me. I didn't really dare to believe that we were really going because of the weather. The launch can also be scrubbed just one second before take-off, because of some technical problem. Until the big solid boosters are lit and you start to move, you never know. Once we left, it was of course a wonderful feeling - 'Yes! We are really going!' When we got into *****e - everyone was shouting and laughing." What was it like to see the ISS for the first time?"First there was just a really big bright star - when it came closer and you could see the details, it was big and beautiful. When you get close to dock, it's really big!" What was it like when you first entered the Station?"You enter into the lab - it is such a big *****e that you can be in the middle and not be able to touch anything. You feel a bit dizzy for the first minutes, when you have been used to the Shuttle where there is less *****e." Can you describe what it was like when you first stepped out of the Airlock for the first *****ewalk?"It was different than planned! We had a very well c*****ographed plan for the way everything was supposed to be done. When Beamer [Robert Curbeam] egressed, he managed somehow to get a door open where the hand control of the SAFER [*****ewalk backpack] is. So suddenly we had a new problem that needed to be solved. I actually had to go out the Airlock to try to fix this - it wasn't something we had trained in the pool, so I wasn't sure that I would be able to. But it worked out, and it gave me self-confidence for the rest." "It is a wonderful view when you are out there, and you can see the Earth and see the big Station. Translating along the truss, I enjoyed that a lot. You can just give yourself a little push and you float a few metres without touching anything." How did you feel at the end of the second *****ewalk, when you had to return inside?"I felt a little bit sad. Particularly because we had resources to stay out for another hour and I was hoping they would come up with something else for us to do - but no one said anything. I tried to hang outside there for as long as I could before we had to go inside. I was very pleased when I got to do the third one!" You trained extensively for this mission, was there still anything that surprised you?"Something that was complicated was to go to the toilet... particularly what the Americans call 'number 2s'. Due to weightlessness the intestines are not the normal way, so you have to work really hard to get things going. It can get quite uncomfortable." Did you get much of an opportunity to look down at Earth, and what where the most impressive things that you saw?"I didn't have as much opportunity as I would have liked to, we were very, very busy. After undocking we started to get a bit more time. The orientation of the Shuttle meant we also got a better view. I was particularly please the first time I saw Sweden. We also saw the Aurora over Sweden - that was beautiful." "One of the best passes though was the very last day. It was night-time over Europe. We came in over Ireland, over England; I could see London. You could clearly see the Netherlands because there was so much light. Then I saw all of the Scandinavian countries, even the southern coast of Norway - I could see clouds covering Oslo which were lit up. I could see up to the middle of Sweden and Finland - Helsinki. On the opposite side of the gulf, Tallinn and St Petersburg. It is just like flying over a map. The light tells you where the cities are, and then just the complete darkness over the water - it was a beautiful pass." What have you been doing since the landing?"I had to go into NASA on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day for data taking for some of the experiments - and then on the 26th we had a big medical exam. On 27 December we started with meetings to prepare for the debriefings and the presentations which we have to start giving very soon. I had just four days off over the New Year. Since then we've been in daily debriefings. I've just come back from EAC [ESA's European Astronaut Centre, in Cologne, Germany] where we had debriefings."What kind of things do you report back on during the debriefings?"Anything from minor technical details which didn't work very well - for example, a camera that was lost during one of the EVAs because of a screw that wasn't really working properly. Through to the overall message for us - we thought there was excellent team work, which helped to make this mission such a success. There was a really good connection between us and the ground crew - they trusted us and we trusted them. It was like we were not only their prolonged arm, but also kind of a prolonged brain to help to give inputs." How was your re-adaptation to gravity when you came back?"My balance was very affected. It felt a bit like you had been drinking heavily. But it came back fairly quickly. On the second day it was barely noticeable, and by the third day it was completely back. The first time I went jogging, five days after we returned, I got a lot more muscle soreness than I would usually get for such a short run." When does your mission completely come to an end?"I will be on the road for at least for half of the time through to April. We are going to visit all the NASA centres with the crew. We are making a crew trip to Europe - the highlights being Scandinavia, EAC and to ESTEC. There are a few things still for the experiments - taking post-flight data - I will be finished with them in another couple of months." Did you expect that Sweden would be enthusiastic about your flight?"Two months before the launch I saw how it was building up, so I did expect some interest - but I never imagined that it would be to that extent. When we had an in-flight call and it was both the Crown Princess and the Deputy Prime Minister there, it was really nice!" Do you have any longer-term plans as an astronaut?"I will spend a couple of months in Europe this summer, partly working at EAC. Then I will be back here in Houston in the autumn and I hope to get another assignment with the Shuttle. I would like to do a long-duration mission." STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of *****e shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final *****e shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of *****e shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the *****e shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the *****e shuttle's last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Sweeping changes needed for moon-Mars initiative BY WILLIAM HARWOOD Ugg Warm
2014-09-20 15:46:24
Posted: August 11, 2014NOTE: GMT is +4 hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time.DockingAugust 12, 20140907 GMT....ISS maneuvers to docking attitude.0921 GMT....S-1/2 hold point. Distance: 24.2 miles (39 km) behind and 3.1 miles (5 km) below *****e station.1008 GMT....S1 hold point. Distance: 9.6 miles (15.5 km) behind and 3.1 miles (5 km) below *****e station.1054 GMT....S2 hold point arrival. Distance: 2.2 miles (3.5 km) behind *****e station. The ATV also reaches the same altitude as the *****e station.1054 - 1125 GMT....Turn on external lights; KURS activation; begin using relative GPS.1125 GMT....S2 hold point departure.1205 GMT....S3 hold point arrival. Distance: 817 feet (249 m) behind *****e station.1205 - 1242 GMT....Activate videometer and telegoniometer instruments; ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1242 GMT....S3 hold point departure.1305 GMT....S4 hold point arrival. Distance: 62 feet (19 m) behind *****e station.1305 - 1318 GMT....Pointing maneuver; ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1318 GMT....S4 hold point departure.1321 GMT....S41 hold point arrival. Distance: 36 feet (11 m) behind *****e station.1321 - 1326 GMT....ATV-CC GO/NO-GO.1326 GMT....S41 hold point departure.1330 GMT....CAPTURE. Georges Lemaitre's forward docking cone is captured by the aft port of the station's Zvezda service module.Data source: ESAFinal Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final *****e shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of *****e shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA's first new human *****ecraft developed since the *****e shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.ATV completes laser-guided dockingSPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: August 13, 2014 Europe's Automated Transfer Vehicle made its final cargo delivery to the International Space Station on Tuesday, completing a smooth computer-controlled docking to resupply the orbiting laboratory with 7.3 tons of fuel, water, experiments and provisions.Fitted with distinctive X-shaped solar arrays, the European Space agency's ATV cargo craft appeared as an insect looming behind the *****e station, with live television views showing the *****eship firing off rocket thrusters to manage its approach.With a glacial closing rate of about 2 inches per second, the 20-ton supply ship linked up with the *****e station's Zvezda service module at 1330 GMT (9:30 a.m. EDT) as the *****ecraft sailed 260 miles over southern Kazakhstan at a velocity of more than 17,000 mph.Lasers and radars guided the ATV for the final phase of the rendezvous, which completed a two-week journey after the craft's July 29 launch aboard an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana.Spectacular photos from Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev, who runs a from the *****e station, show the *****ecraft's rendezvous and docking.See our for the latest news on the mission. Barbour Men Waterproof Jackets
2014-09-20 11:30:26
I was traveling through the Middle East, a rare sight of a woman alone with her children. Everywhere we went, small children with large, dark, haunted eyes would watch my son and daughter as they laughed easily, teased each other and tried to talk to one another in Arabic from a small red phrasebook. One day we sat on a hot, dusty, crowded train. As the vista flashed by outside the window, a young boy, close to the same age as my son, sat across from us with his father. He watched quietly, seriously, as my children giggled, poked at one another and pointed out goats, mountains and beautiful rolling dunes awash in browns, soft pinks and ochers. My daughter turned to the boy and spoke a short phrase to him - "Hello; how are you?" - and suddenly he smiled, huge brown eyes lighting up and his face transformed into that of a beautiful and carefree young man. He began to answer when his father, eyes flashing, gave him a sharp reprimand in the universal language that every parent understands, the tone conveying words I understood in a language I could not. The boy cast his eyes downward. I looked at the man and attempted his language. "I'm sorry and it is not my business yet...why is it not alright for our children to speak with one another?" He looked at me and, with a small sigh, said "Our children are not the same." I said, "We are not wealthy people; you have no reason to dislike us." He barked a short laugh and said, "You, wealthy? You have riches. We -" he pointed at his breast, "we have wealth. We have the wealth that comes from true knowledge of our Creator, of our thousands of years of history, of our struggles. Of our losses. Of our families, of our heritage, of our culture. Your children have riches. Riches of the promise of a future. My son has wealth. But the promise of a future...?" He raised his arms heavenward in a fatalistic gesture and slowly turned his head to look out the window of the train. His proud face looked resigned yet strangely at peace. I woke up with tears running down my face.
2014-02-11 02:34:12
The dream began with me sitting in my class listening to the professor’s lecture. It was the last class of the day and everybody was tired. At last, it was time for the class to finish but the professor kept teaching. When my classmate told the professor that it was time for the class to finish, he turned around and said rudely that he knows when to finish teaching and also we shouldn’t bother him with it. After teaching for another five minutes he left the class, and everybody hurried outside as it was time for busses to leave. I ran to my locker as I didn’t want to miss my bus. Since the locker was far away from my class, it took me time to reach there. There was a lot of hustle bustle around as everybody was rushing. I stuffed all the papers from my locker in my bag as I was in hurry. But when I turned around there was *****ody in sight. The school was empty and there was dead silence. I was scared because just a moment ago there were so many students around. However I gathered up all mu courage and went outside. I saw a bus in the parking lot but *****ody was sitting inside. Thinking that it was the school bus I sat in it. Soon I realized that it wasn’t the school bus but it was too late. The bus took me to a place which was very dark and misty. I got down and started crying, suddenly somebody tapped on my shoulder and called my name. I woke up abruptly realizing that I had been daydreaming during my history class and my friend was tapping on my shoulder trying to wake me up. Feelings:
2013-09-28 05:11:38


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